Blade Runner, Back to the Future: Were any movie predictions of the future accurate?

From hover boards to flying cars, there have been some bold predictions for the future made in movies over the decades.

Now we are living in the times that those Hollywood classics looked forward to. 

And although technology is evolving, we are yet to see some of the creations featured in the blockbusters come to life – but other ideas were closer to the truth. 

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Harrison Ford as Deckard in Blade Runner: The Final Cut.

1996-98 AccuSoft Inc.

Harrison Ford as Deckard in Blade Runner: The Final Cut.

BLADE RUNNER

We’re talking Harrison Ford’s iconic 1982 flick – not the Ryan Gosling remake which was set in 2049.

Artificial Intelligence

Set in November 2019, AI was one of the biggest inclusions in the film, and it’s not too far from the truth. While we have our own versions of robotic humans, they’re not as life like or capable as those in the film.

However, much like the film’s character Pris, the technology has evolved to become part of the sex industry.

Video Calling

The inclusion of video calls in the film was spot on – now, it’s used by multiple smartphone apps including Facebook Messenger, Apple’s FaceTime, and of course, Skype.

Flying Cars

Not quite. Elon Musk is creating the next generation of cars – electric vehicles – but he’s yet to nail down a flying car.

A tech startup in Germany, Lilium, recently tested a five-seater air taxi – so we’re getting closer to having the right kind of technology, but our city’s infrastructure doesn’t yet support it.

Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd combined sci-fi with high school hijinks in Back to the Future.

Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd combined sci-fi with high school hijinks in Back to the Future.

BACK TO THE FUTURE: PART II

An obvious one to add to the list, Back to the Future: Part II made some wild claims for the year 2015.

Self-lacing shoes

While Marty McFly’s self-lacing Nike shoes aren’t a popular item on the streets yet, they do exist. The sportswear giant made a version of the shoes with self-fitting technology – or EARL (Electric Adaptable Reaction Lacing) – called the HyperAdapt, which retail for US$350 (NZD$541).

Drones

In the film, a drone took a dog for a walk. Our drones aren’t yet that capable, but they are popular in the farming and photography industries.

Face scanning

The 1989 fantasy film used facial and fingerprint scanning technology, similar to the tech our smart phones use. But the film went a step further by using face scanners instead of door handles, whereas we’re still just using it to unlock phones.

Hover Board

Unfortunately, we were still a wee while away from the old hover board like McFly’s in the film.

In the last few years a type of hover board has been released – though it still has wheels. However, they initially suffered some safety issues, with some catching fire. So it seems we needed to perfect the version with wheels before playing around with hovering technology.

They were a few bold claims - the evolution of fashion - but also a few inclusions that have proved relatively accurate.

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

They were a few bold claims – the evolution of fashion – but also a few inclusions that have proved relatively accurate.

THE ISLAND: Cloning

Though it might not be as well known, the 2005 flick was peering into a future that ultimately doesn’t exist. Starring Scarlett Johansen and Ewan McGregor this movie was all about cloning.

Set in July, 2019, the premise of the film sees clones created as back-up parts for people if their real-life versions were to get sick or injured.

Cloning wasn’t new in the real world at the time. Over 20 years ago Dolly the sheep was cloned. In 2018, a monkey was also successfully cloned.

There’s yet to be any human cloning performed.

2012: End of the world

When the movie 2012 came out in 2009 many thought they were finding out how the world was going to end. But luckily for us, the predictions were just for Hollywood.

The film was based on the Mayan myth that the world was going to end on December 21, 2012. But given that you are sitting there, reading this article, it’s fair to say it was exactly that – a myth.

Unlike the movie, the world didn’t fall into turmoil from natural disasters such as tsunamis, volcanoes, and earthquakes, at the end of that year.